Be Prepared with a Workplace Emergency Checklist

Be Prepared with a Workplace Emergency Checklist
Families need emergency checklists available so they know what to do if their loved ones are injured on the job. Knowing what information to have available can help a spouse be prepared if their significant other is involved in a workplace accident. Here is a checklist of the information you should have gathered just in case your family is faced with your spouse’s injury accident from the attorneys at Rush & Frisco Law.

Information Spouses Should Gather

The best way to know what to do in the event of an emergency is to have a binder with current information in a readily accessible place. You should include a table of contents to ensure that you will easily be able to find pertinent information when it is necessary. Here is some emergency information to include in your binder.
Workplace Emergency Checklist
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    Your spouse's full name

    While you obviously don’t need a reminder to remember your spouse’s name, you might need to hand information to the authorities, and they might not know who your spouse is. Include your spouse’s full legal name in the binder. It also makes it easier if you plan to keep binders for several family members so you can grab the correct one.

    Name and address of the employer and/or worksite

    You should also include the name and address of your spouse’s employer and the address of any offsite location where they are performing work. Many workers move from worksite to worksite, so it’s a good idea to include information about the particular site where your loved one is working. Knowing your spouse’s current location can also make it easier for you to contact them or for first responders to find them.

    Your spouse's supervisor's name and contact information

    You should also include the name and address of your spouse’s employer and the address of any offsite location where they are performing work. Many workers move from worksite to worksite, so it’s a good idea to include information about the particular site where your loved one is working. Knowing your spouse’s current location can also make it easier for you to contact them or for first responders to find them.

    Name, address, and phone number for the company's headquarters

    You should also include the name, address, and phone number of your spouse’s company’s headquarters. This is who will be responsible for your spouse’s safety, the type of work being performed, and whether your spouse might have been affected.

    Your spouse's employment contract or employee handbook

    If your spouse has an employment contract, you should keep a copy in the emergency binder. If your spouse does not have an employment contract, keep a copy of their employee handbook and/or the company’s policies in the binder. Doing so can provide good information about the expectations each party has about the job and the work performed.

    Your spouse's title and duties

    You should also list your spouse’s specific title and job duties. In the event of a crisis, this information can help to determine whether they might have been impacted by the emergency. Including this type of information can help you address important matters in a crisis.

    Your spouse's coworkers' names and contact details

    Include your spouse’s coworkers’ names and contact information. If you can’t locate your spouse, knowing the information of the people who work with them can help you learn information about what has happened.

    Information about who to contact at the company in an emergency

    When your spouse was hired, the company likely provided information about who to contact in the event of an emergency. Following the company’s emergency protocols can be a fast way for you to get answers.

    Legal documentation

    If you and your spouse do not have power of attorney and living wills, it is a good idea to have these documents drafted. A power of attorney allows you to designate someone you trust to make important decisions for you about your medical care and finances if you become incapacitated and are not able to make decisions for yourself. A living will allows you to have some say about the types of end-of-life care you want to receive. Having these documents can make it much easier for you to handle your spouse’s medical care and finances if they are incapacitated in an accident.

    Preferred hospitals

    You should also include the name and address of your spouse’s preferred hospital. This can help you to find your spouse if they have been transported to the hospital following an accident.

    Details about your spouse's company vehicle

    If your spouse drives a company vehicle, keep information about the make, model, and condition of the vehicle. Include occasional pictures and a list of problems you have reported to the company in the past. You should also include any driving certifications your spouse might have.

    Talk to Rush & Frisco

    If your spouse has been injured in a workplace accident, you should speak to the experienced workers’ compensation attorneys at Rush & Frisco Law. We can help you navigate the complex rules involved with the Florida workers’ compensation system to ensure your spouse and your family receive the benefits they deserve. Contact us today for a free consultation at (352) 373-7566 or fill out the online form.